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Jun. 1st, 2004

Damn you, scholargipsy! I haven't been able to get the word "gadzookery" out of my head all weekend!

Interestingly enough, dictionary.com doesn't have it in their database. (I was looking it up to confirm spelling.) Merriam-Online has it, though. According to them, the etymology is a derivation from "God's hooks" -- not "God's wounds" -- referring, of course, to the nails used to crucify Christ.

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( 9 comments — Leave a comment )
scholargipsy
Jun. 1st, 2004 09:07 am (UTC)
Interestingly enough, dictionary.com doesn't have it in their database. (I was looking it up to confirm spelling.) Merriam-Online has it, though. According to them, the etymology is a derivation from "God's hooks" -- not "God's wounds" -- referring, of course, to the nails used to crucify Christ.

D'oh! I knew that sounded a little off. But it's a fun word in any case, no?
queue
Jun. 1st, 2004 09:13 am (UTC)
"God's wounds" is the source for "zounds", I believe.
spwebdesign
Jun. 1st, 2004 09:35 am (UTC)
Yes, we knew this. But someone (whether R, treacle_well, or scholargipsy, I don't remember) thought "gadzookery" was also derived from "God's wounds."

It's fun hanging out with a bunch of sesquipedalians! ;)
bubblebabble
Jun. 1st, 2004 06:16 pm (UTC)
gadzookery! gadzookery! gadzookery!
am0
Jun. 5th, 2004 08:40 pm (UTC)
"Gadzooks," from god's hooks, used to be a common enough exclamation, but "gadzookery" is pretty rare. I'm not sure it's legitimate.
spwebdesign
Jun. 6th, 2004 01:14 am (UTC)
It's a perfectly legitimate English word, meaning the "use of archaic words."
am0
Jun. 6th, 2004 03:53 pm (UTC)
Now that is an example of arbitrarily assigning a new meaning to a word that already has an established meaning based simply on context and use. Such word overloading is more common in science than outside of science.
spwebdesign
Jun. 6th, 2004 04:27 pm (UTC)
You may not have heard of it before, but it is hardly a new word.
am0
Jun. 6th, 2004 04:54 pm (UTC)
Once again you've ignored what I've said to say something totally different. I didn't say it was a new word. They took a word that had an established meaning, added a suffix and assigned a totally unrelated meaning to the resulting word.

That particular process is known as overloading.

I have probably heard the word misused in this particular manner at some time in the past and rejected it as meaningless. We continue to use much older words unrelated to mild profanity. They come from a variety of sources. On the other hand, some seemingly ancient words turn out to be quite modern in origin. An old word that continues to be useful in one segment of the population may suddenly reach the awareness of the popular press who, in their ignorance, see it as an amusing anacronism. This particular invented term is based on ignorance -- valid, legitimate words exist to express the same idea.
( 9 comments — Leave a comment )

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