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Book 36

  1. Pohl, Frederik — Gateway (278 pages)
  2. Clement, Hal — Mission of Gravity (193 pages)
  3. Benford, Gregory — Timescape (499 pages)
  4. O'Hare, Mick (editor) — Why Don't Penguins Feet Freeze? and 114 Other Questions (232 pages)
  5. Dos Passos, John — Number One (218 pages)
  6. Heller, Joseph — Catch-22 (457 pages)
  7. St. John of the Cross — Dark Night of the Soul (119 pages)
  8. Day, Dorothy — The Long Loneliness (286 pages)
  9. Allen, Ted, Kyan Douglas, Thom Filicia, Carson Kressley, and Jai Rodriguez — Queer Eye for the Straight Guy: The Fab 5's Guide to Looking Better, Cooking Better, Dressing Better, Behaving Better, and Living Better (250 pages)
  10. Whittemore, Carroll E., ed. (William Duncan, illus.) — Symbols of the Church (59 pages)
  11. Hardy, Thomas — Jude the Obscure (507 pages)
  12. Lee, Harper — To Kill a Mockingbird (278 pages)
  13. Mann, Thomas (Helen T. Lowe-Porter, transl.) — Death in Venice (73 pages)
  14. Kempis, Thomas à — The Imitation of Christ (165 pages)
  15. West, Canon Edward N. — Outward Signs: The Language of Christian Symbolism (232 pages)
  16. Alexander, Lloyd — The High King (253 pages)
  17. Bellairs, John — St. Fidgeta & Other Parodies (84 pages)
  18. Endo, Shusaku — Silence (300 pages)
  19. Moorcock, Michael — Behold the Man (137 pages)
  20. Pouncey, Peter — Rules for Old Men Waiting (208 pages)
  21. Davies, Robertson — Tempest-Tost (The Salterton Trilogy) (235 pages)
  22. Davies, Robertson — Leaven of Malice (The Salterton Trilogy) (218 pages)
  23. Davies, Robertson — A Mixture of Frailties (The Salterton Trilogy) (311 pages)
  24. Austen, Jane — Pride and Prejudice (274 pages)
  25. Murakami, Haruki — Hard-boiled Wonderland and the End of the World (400 pages)
  26. Burrows, Ruth, O.C.D. — Essence of Prayer (210 pages)
  27. McCarthy, Cormac — The Road (239 pages)
  28. Dahl, Roald — The BFG (184 pages)
  29. Eugenides, Jeffrey — The Virgin Suicides (247 pages)
  30. Geoffrey of Monmouth — The History of the Kings of Britain (280 pages)
  31. Figgess, Sandra — Christian Initiation of Older Children (87 pages)
  32. Clarke, Susanna — Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (1006 pages)
  33. Sobel, Dava — Longitude (179 pages)
  34. Bradbury, Ray — The Martian Chronicles (181 pages)
  35. Jones, Steve — Y: The Descent of Men (263 pages)
  36. Pratchett, Terry, and Neil Gaiman — Good Omens (375 pages)

Page count: 9,517 of targeted 12,500.

Thank you, seinneann_ceoil for lending Good Omens to me. That it took me a week (or was it two) to read it is a testament to how crazily busy I've been until now. Really, this is the sort of thing one knocks off in one or two days, just like Pratchett's Discworld books.

And just like the Discworld books, Good Omens was bizarre and enjoyable, but not particularly memorable. Aside from a flying sofa (or was it a talking sofa, or both?), I remember nothing of those first two Discworld books I read, though I do remember enjoying them a great deal, moreso than Good Omens. Part of it was that my expectations for Good Omens were so high. It seems to be everyone's favorite funny book, and I was anticipating all sorts of laugh-out-loud moments. There was one, briefly, towards the end of the book.

I did enjoy it a good deal, nonetheless. One needs a read like this every so often, especially when one has a lot of mental stressors in life. A read like your typical Pratchett novel.

Which this was. I didn't hear Gaiman's voice coming through at all. At least, not the Gaiman I've grown to love in American Gods, Stardust, Coraline, and Neverwhere. (I haven't read any of his graphic novels.) To me this felt like Pratchett through and through, which makes for great escapist reading, but it lacked the shades of darkness and magic that Gaiman brings to his stories.

Comments

( 1 comment — Leave a comment )
spiderourhero
Dec. 20th, 2007 05:46 am (UTC)
Hrmph. I liked Good Omens. And if it makes you feel any better I read it almost 5 years ago and I haven't completely forgotten it.

I liked the nice and accurate prophecies of agnes nutter, the dogs, the anti-christ, the motorcycle, the creepy demon guy who liked to torment his plants, Famine's spooky preference for extremely thin electronic devices, and all of the tea. It was heresy at its proper British best.

It also reminded me a lot of the Sandman comic books--in particular, A Game of You, which had a witch character in it and a bunch of weird, darkly funny characters. It's worth reading if you get a chance.
( 1 comment — Leave a comment )

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