?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Book 10

  1. Portis, Charles — True Grit (215 pages)
  2. Simpson, Joe — Touching the Void (210 pages)
  3. Bardin, John Franklin — The Last of Philip Banter (207 pages)
  4. Millar, Martin — The Good Fairies of New York (278 pages)
  5. Millar, Mark — Kick-Ass (190 pages)
  6. Sachar, Louis — Holes (225 pages)
  7. Baxter, Stephen — Moonseed (523 pages)
  8. Buchan, John — The Thirty-Nine Steps (152 pages)
  9. Bukowski, Charles — Post Office (167 pages)
  10. Palahniuk, Chuck — Fight Club (211 pages)

Page count: 2378.

The first rule about fight club is you don't talk about fight club.

The second rule about fight club is you don't talk about fight club.

I'm very tempted to end my review here.

But I suppose I'll break the first two rules and say a little bit more.

As I'm sure most of you did, I saw the movie recently after it came out. I thought it was a great movie. I didn't realize at first what it was all about, but then the big plot twist hit me upside the head and opened my eyes.

For the sake of my reading pleasure, I wish I had not seen the movie before I read the book. Fight Club was still an interesting read, but it lacked a bit of punch knowing all along the big secret about Tyler Durden. Therefore, when I got to the "hidden gun" (as Palahniuk calls his big plot twists), it was sporting an empty chamber.

I watched the movie again after finishing the book. It is an extremely faithful adaptation but for the very end. Large chunks of it are almost word-for-word what's in the book. And, for a change, I like it better than the novel. The drastically different ending works better in the movie than in the book. It's so rare that a film adaptation ends up being better than the book it adapts, especially when the writer isn't involved in the filmmaking process.

Latest Month

December 2016
S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Lilia Ahner