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Panama
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Book 23

  1. Meredith, Martin — The State of Africa: A History of Fifty Years of Independence (736 pages)
  2. Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o — Wizard of the Crow (766 pages)
  3. Coetzee, J.M. — Life & Times of Michael K (182 pages)
  4. Saint-Exupery, Antoine de — The Little Prince (101 pages)
  5. Brunner, John — Stand on Zanzibar (661 pages)
  6. Dahl, Roald — Fantastic Mr Fox (79 pages)
  7. Walker, Barbara — TEENY-TINY and the Witch-Woman (29 pages)
  8. Shakespeare, William — A Midsummer Night's Dream (23 pages)
  9. Powers, Richard — The Time of Our Singing (631 pages)
  10. McEwan, Ian — In Between the Sheets (134 pages)
  11. Ishiguro, Kazuo — A Pale View of Hills (182 pages)
  12. Niven, Larry — Ringworld (284 pages)
  13. Anderson, Poul — Tau Zero (184 pages)
  14. Eisenberg, Bryan & Jeffrey, with Lisa T. Davis — Call to Action: Secret Formulas to Improve Online Results (273 pages)
  15. Andrews, Stephen E. and Nick Rennison — 100 Must-Read Science Fiction Novels (205 pages)
  16. Andrews, Stephen E. and Nick Rennison — 100 Must-Read Fantasy Novels (197 pages)
  17. Niles, Steve and Ben Templesmith — 30 Days of Night (103 pages)
  18. Terkel, Studs — And They All Sang: Great Musicians Talk about Their Music (321 pages)
  19. Andrews, Stephen E. and Duncan Bowis — 100 Must-Read Books for Men (200 pages)
  20. Dahl, Roald — The Witches (202 pages)
  21. Millar, Mark and J.G. Jones and Paul Mounts — Wanted (192 pages)
  22. Hoban, Russell — Riddley Walker (240 pages)
  23. Perkins, E.J. — American English English American (47 pages)

Page count: 5869.

The Mad Fisher gave me her Christmas gift on Saturday, so I quickly read through it. It's a "dictionary" of American and English terms. She thought it would be cute, since we've had our fair share of discussions about differences between American and British English. (As I often say, the most challenging thing about moving to England has been the language difference.) It was a great idea.

Unfortunately, this book is complete rubbish. It really requires another dictionary to translate a Welsh person's "understanding" of Americanisms to American English. I've not heard of probably a third of the "American" expressions the author used, and my English is wholly American. Some of the translations were simply ridiculous. Trust me, Mrs. Perkins, Americans have heard of "breasts"; we don't tend to go around calling them "bazooms"! And "dollar" is not a British term that needs to be translated to "buck"!

I am half tempted to put together my own list. I could probably produce a product a million times for accurate and interesting in a half-day's brainstorm than the author compiled in this book.

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